Bike Modifications

Mountain Bike Amputee does not charge or collect membership fees and does not manufacture or sell products or services. PLEASE NOTE: Mountain biking and cycling have inherent risks. Always wear appropriate protective gear and ride within your comfort zone and ability.

 

Home

History & Mission

Arm Amputees

Leg Amputees

Mountain Bike Riding Tips

Bike Modifications

Prosthetic Modifications

Suggestions From The Net

News And Events

MTB Group Rides & Clinics

Links

AmpsCanRide

ATV-Amputees

Motorcycle-Amputee

Snowmobile-Amputee

Prosthetic Suppliers & Manufacturers

Sponsors & Benefactors

Webstats And Contact

 

This page was created to provide information on Mountain Bike Modifications including mountain bike brakes, brake levers, gear shifters, pedals, cranks, and more.

If you have modified the brakes or shifters on your mountain or road bike, or would like information on modifying bike brakes or gear shifters, email your enquiries or pictures and information to:

mtb-amputee@mtb-amputee.com

Mountain Bike Modifications for Arm Amputees.

Mountain Bike Modifications for Leg Amputees.

Off Road Wheelchairs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

Mountain Bike Modifications for Arm Amputees.

The following examples of Mountain Bike Brake and Shifter set-ups for Arm Amputees are only a few of the many possible brake & shifter configurations.

You will see that it is possible to mix and match different brake levers and shifters to suit your personal needs.

The best brake-shifter configuration is the one that suits your disability along with your riding skills and style.

Recently, Sram, makers of the original grip shift system, has developed a new drive train (XX1) that uses a single front chain ring which eliminates the need of a front shifter. Although the single front chain ring has been used by down hill racers and free riders since the mid 1990's (see my 1999 Norco VPS set-up below), the new Sram system offers a wider range of gears on the rear cog, which makes the system more suitable for every day or cross country riding. Also the XX1 system comes with your choice of grip shift or trigger shifter.

0==0==0==0==0

The following pictures are of my (Victor on History & Mission Page2009 Haro Sonix.

In order to accommodate all the controls, the handlebar was changed to a wider 27" bar and the brakes were changed from Shimano to Avid brakes, also the optical gear display was removed to accommodate the controls. (Thanks to Pacific Rim Bicycle for doing the bike modifications) The controls feature Shimano Rapid Fire Plus shifters and Avid hydraulic brakes (Elixir R front brake and Juicy 3.5 rear brake). A short stem was added for additional stability and control (A shorter stem and wider handlebar slows down the steering, making it more stable). Bar ends are used to keep the prosthetic arm/hook from slipping off the handlebar and to rest and relax your hand.

Click On Pictures To Enlarge.

     

The top shifter and brake lever operate the front derailleur and brake. The bottom shifter and brake lever operate the rear derailleur and brake.

0==0==0==0==0

MTB-Amputee would like to thank Brodie Bikes for supplying a 2004 Brodie Hurricane full suspension bike for demonstration purposes.

The first picture shows the bike with original stock parts with the exception of the bar ends and short stem. The second picture shows the bike with the following modifications: The front fork, rear shock, and pedals were changed from short travel cross country style to beefier long travel free ride style, while the front brake was changed to a Hayes due to malfunctions caused by inverting the Shimano hydraulic brake.

Click On Pictures To Enlarge.

Image001.jpg (122911 bytes)  Brodie008.jpg (178789 bytes)

The following three pictures feature Shimano Deore 9speed rapid rise shifters along with Shimano hydraulic brake levers. The top shifter & brake lever operate the front derailleur and brake while the bottom shifter & brake lever operate the rear derailleur and brake.

Click on picture to enlarge.

Image007.jpg (87010 bytes)  Image006.jpg (104826 bytes)  Image002.jpg (74919 bytes)

You will notice that the shifters have non removable optical gear displays and the brake levers have remote fluid reservoirs. Although it would be better to have the brake fluid contained in the brake lever such as Hayes brakes and to have removable gear displays, these pictures prove that you can use and easily adapt newer, high end components.

0==0==0==0==0

The following pictures feature the services of Jason Place from Pacific Rim Bicycle. Jason is seen here removing the optical gear display from the same Shimano Deore 9spd shifter (pictured above) as well as modifying the gear display housing by sawing off the optical display window. (please note, before you saw, remove the gear display indicator by simply pulling off the small retaining spring.

Click on picture to enlarge.

Image008.jpg (53933 bytes)  Image011.jpg (85145 bytes)

Here, Jason replaces the modified gear display housing.

Image012.jpg (55714 bytes)

This picture shows the sawed off housing along with the display indicator and retaining spring.

Click on picture to enlarge.

Image005.jpg (52035 bytes)

0==0==0==0==0

The following pictures show the same Shimano Deore 9spd controls as pictured above except with the optical gear display removed. (sawed off) You will notice how tightly and close the controls fit together.

Click on picture to enlarge.

Image013.jpg (82574 bytes)  Image016.jpg (81863 bytes)

These pictures feature the same controls and set up as above with the exception of the front brake which has been changed from a Shimano to a Hayes hydraulic brake. This was necessary because the Shimano brake would occasionally develop an air lock from being turned upside down.

Click on picture to enlarge.

Brodie006.jpg (171169 bytes)  Brodie011.jpg (161331 bytes)

0==0==0==0==0

The following pictures show the controls for a right hand set-up.

The controls feature Shimano 8-speed rapid fire shifters & Shimano clone V-brake levers along with Hayes & Shimano cable actuated disc brakes.

The top lever& shifter (which are mounted upside down) control the front brake & derailleur.

The bottom shifter & brake lever control the rear brake & derailleur.

Click on picture to enlarge.

   

0==0==0==0==0

The following pictures feature Hayes Hydraulic Disc Brake Leavers combined with a Shimano XTR 8 speed shifter.

Although this set-up uses a single front ring,  you will notice a shifter pod mount included in the set-up to accommodate a front shifter if desired.

Click on picture to enlarge.

 

0==0==0==0==0

You can see by this picture how the hook-terminal clamps on to the handle bar.

Click on picture to enlarge.

The following pictures feature a steering wheel adaptor made by Hosmer. The adaptor allows you to ride with a conventional arm as well as provides a basic release option while crashing (as opposed to being locked on as shown above).

Click on picture to enlarge.

newarm001.jpg (137665 bytes)  newarm002.jpg (114494 bytes)  newarm005.jpg (80800 bytes)

The following pictures show how easy it is to use a conventional arm with the adaptor. Please note that the arm pictured below has had several minor modifications made to it in order to make it safer for riding. For more info on the arm visit the Prosthetic Modifications page

Click on picture to enlarge.

newarm028.jpg (95826 bytes)  newarm029.jpg (92888 bytes)  newarm035.jpg (94018 bytes)

0==0==0==0==0

The following pictures show a new 8spd Shimano XT shifter with an optical gear display. In order to fit all the controls on one side, you must remove the optical display. Please note that not all shifters have removable display units. Also you can remove the display unit from some, but not all, Shimano 9spd shifters.

Click on picture to enlarge.

   

0==0==0==0==0

The following picture and information was submitted by Jeremy Gordon.

HI, I'm a one armed mtb biker and I use a PVC cup puttied onto a bar end and just put my stump in the cup (I'm below right elbow) . I've attached pictures of the set up I've got on my flat bar roadie. In terms of bike tips, I have a Rohloff hub which is a just a grip shift that provides full 27 speed gear range with only one front ring and an internal geared rear hub. I can recommend it. Cheers Jeremy Gordon, Sydney Australia

Click on picture to enlarge.

Stay tuned for more pictures and information.

0==0==0==0==0

The following pictures and information were contributed by Paco Diaz de León.

Here are some pictures of one of my mountain bikes, it has hydraulic disc brakes, this set up works perfect, I brake the rear wheel with my index finger and the front wheel with my middle finger. As soon as possible I will send you more pictures of my mechanical disc brake mtb and my road bike as well as my prosthesis which I also designed.

Click on pictures to enlarge.

For more info you can contact Paco at: pacodiler@hotmail.com

0==0==0==0==0

The following pictures and information were contributed by Oli Sparrow:

I just came across your website and thought you may be interested in a product I am currently developing.
Essentially, it is a hydraulic lever that operates in two planes to give both individual and simultaneous control of the brakes. Individual control being very important for more active riding disciplines (DH XC Trials etc)
I am not at liberty to discuss the workings further but its ok if you work it out for yourself.
I have attached a couple of pictures of the design as it stands.
For more information you can contact Oli.
Oli Sparrow I DESIGN PROFESSIONAL E-Mail: oli.sparrow@ntlworld.com  Web: www.olisparrow.co.uk

Click on pictures to enlarge.

A quick update, I'm in the closing stages of product development and prototyping of the brake lever i showed you before.
Here is a link to my portfolio website and the preliminary info + prototype pictures of the design: http://olisparrow.co.uk/HTM/ProductDesign.html I should have a perfect working prototype in a matter of weeks, I'll let you know how it works out. Regards Oli

0==0==0==0==0

Pyramid offers a single lever dual pull cable brake that operates both brakes with one lever. They are available through www.gaerlan.com

0==0==0==0==0

The following pictures and information was contributed by Raulillo.

Hi, I am attaching some pictures for upload in your web; I have a disability in my right hand and use the brake levers and shifters with my left hand in my bike.
Both brake levers are placed in parallel; a lever is on the handlebar and the other is on clamp of a Cinelli Spinaci road extension for time trial.
The front derailleur is operated by a trigger shifter and the rear derailleur is operated by a twist shifter (grip shift type).

Click on pictures to enlarge.

0==0==0==0==0

The following pictures and information was contributed by Charles Holden.

Recently I started mountain biking again on some pretty steep trails, having only a rear v brake was a limiting factor, I bought a new Santa Cruz with Shimano disks to see how a disk brake would help, I boiled the fluid and again had some moments, after looking around and not finding any good solutions I made up my own, and now run both the front and rear disks off of the same lever, I haven’t ridden enough hills yet to know if I need to adjust the front to rear bias, but if I need to, I think the best solution will by changing rotor size and pad composition.
I have attached pictures as I have not seen this anywhere else and was all over the web prior to attempting this. So far on the rides I have been on this set-up has worked remarkably well, I will try the Ridge Trail at Montano de Oro next week for the torture test.
Please pass this along as it may be of benefit to someone else.
Charles Holden
charlesholden@earthlink.net

Click on pictures to enlarge.

  

0==0==0==0==0

If you are looking for hydraulic brake splitters, you may want to check out R-One (manufacture of off road wheel chairs).

http://www.r-onefourcross.com/

0==0==0==0==0

The following information and pictures were submitted  by Ashley Smith.

I am a final year student at Birmingham city University in the UK, I am currently working on a design project based on designing a set up for a rider who only has the use of one arm. I also work in a cycle shop (part time now, although i was full time for 7 years) anyhow, last year i had a customer approach me about finding a solution for his son (who had very limited use of the left had side of his body) I i converted a profile design STI adapter to allow brake cables to fit inside it, giving us a 2-1 adapter and also used the usual trick with the shifters. I have a couple of friends who have similar conversions too, so this is a subject that is close to my heart.

Many thanks Ashley Smith

For more information you can email Ashley: Ashley.Smith2@mail.bcu.ac.uk

0==0==0==0==0

The following picture and information was contributed by Jeff Cohen.

This brake splitter is used for racing motorcycles with doubled sided drum brakes, and is one cable in and two out. The cable ends used are 5/16 inch diameter.

Click on picture to enlarge.

CableSplitterTwo.jpg (96560 bytes)

As the input is 100% and the outputs are 50% each, there may be suitability issues for use in a system operating front and rear brakes simultaneously. Perhaps someone may be able to work out some way of utilizing this with a spring mounting incorporated into the rear cable to lower the pull to prevent locking under emergency braking conditions. (There are such devices used on comfort/touring style peddle bikes)

0==0==0==0==0

For information on hydraulic brake splitters, you can contact the people at:

http://www.r-onefourcross.com/products.html

0==0==0==0==0

The following photos are of Justin Black along with several engineering students that developed this bike for use with one arm only. Their design recently tied for first at an university engineering competition.

Click on pictures to enlarge.

bikeprojectweb.jpg (75714 bytes)  discbrakeweb.jpg (294529 bytes)

For more information visit:

www.umd.umich.edu/univ/ur/press_releases/

0==0==0==0==0

The following two pictures were submitted by Ky Nam Tran who is featured on the Suggestions From The Net page. If you would like more information on Ky Nam visit: http://b2r.free.fr?lang=1

cintre-1-pv.jpg (34209 bytes) cintre-4-pv.jpg (36395 bytes)

0==0==0==0==0

The following photos were contributed by David Green who is an above left elbow amputee. The modifications were made by JT Cycles in Salisbury South Australia.

The right hand controls which include the stock Shimano EF29 8 speed rear shifter that came with the bike, are combined with a 3 speed trigger shifter that operates the front. The tandem brake set-up, which uses a throttle cable joiner from a Triumph motorcycle, controls the front & rear brakes and is operated by a Shimano V-brake lever.

Click on pictures to enlarge.

David-Green01.jpg (144387 bytes) David-Green02.jpg (126526 bytes) David-Green03.jpg (133699 bytes)

Since I posted photos of my previous bike (stolen whilst shopping) I have replaced it with an Avanti Barracuda which has shimano hydraulic disc brakes and 27 speed shimano gearing. I had the bike shop replace the left shifter with a 3 spd thumb shift fitted to the right hand bar end and also replace the left brake lever with another right hand lever which was fitted above the original right brake lever (2 RH brake levers) The bottom for the back brake and the top for front brake.
I have found this system works very well and gives me independent braking from either wheel.
I have also purchased a fitness cycle (road hybrid) which is an Avanti Blade Elite I have also modified this bike in the exact same way as my Barracuda.

DaveGreen-DSC00001.jpg (297013 bytes) DaveGreen-DSC00002.jpg (291807 bytes) DaveGreen-DSC00003.jpg (348811 bytes) DaveGreen-IMG_0003.jpg (530403 bytes)

For more information you can contact David at: halfarm@bigpond.com

0==0==0==0==0

The following pictures were contributed by Barry Simmons-Stuber, the father of Molly Simmons-Stuber who is featured on the Arm Amputees page. If you would like more information on Mollys' arm or bike set-up, check out Prosthetic Modifications or visit her webpage at: www.amp-info.net/BikePros.htm

Click on pictures to enlarge.

MollyBike003.jpg (52201 bytes)  Molly004.jpg (109161 bytes)

Mollys' 21speed bike features a Sram 7 speed grip shift for the rear derailleur along with a ProMax single lever tandem brake set-up pictured below, that works both brakes with one lever.

Molly1404.jpg (56574 bytes)   Molly1409.jpg (48268 bytes)

0==0==0==0==0

The following information was submitted by Matthew Potts and Michael Potts.

This adaption was made for my brother who Was in a motorcycle accident and suffered from a Brachial plexus injury which completely disabled his right arm from the shoulder down. I adapted his mtn bike for him . Using the original Shimano xt hydraulic disc brakes with rapid rise shifter brake lever combination for the left side (front brake and shifter.) vintage 2004. For the rear shifter i used a Sram xo grip shifter and turned it upside down to, allow mounting on left side. For the rear brake i connected inline to the front brake using a line slitter made out of an aluminum block with 3 holes drilled and tapped to accept standard shimano brake fittings provided by our friend at 3 ring cycles in San Anselmo CA. I mounted the splitter about 8 inches down the front and split it off to the rear. Bleeding required some effort. I had to bleed the system about 3 times from the calliper up rear first then front then rear and so on. Before delivering to my brother I tested it on ELDRIDGE grade on the North side of Mt Tamalpais in Marin County . It proved to work very well and the brakes worked even in steep rocky down hills . We are exited to ride and this sight gives us inspiration. Thanks so much for the inspiration. For more information you can contact Matthew and Michael Potts at: mvpotts1@yahoo.com

Click on pictures to enlarge.

0==0==0==0==0

The following pictures were contributed by Stephen Burke, who lives in Calgary and works with the Para Cycle program at the Olympic Oval. He is also involved with the National Team and has been coaching various Para Cycle athletes for over 10 Years now. The pictures are of Jay Milley's Bike. Jay is a 4 limb amp who Stephen has been coaching for 4 years now...he should be on the national team in 1-2 more years, in time for London in 2012...he has 2 Below Knee, 1 Below Elbow and his only hand has 2 fingers and no thumb.

Click on pictures to enlarge.

For more information you can contact Stephen Burke at the Olympic Oval National Cycling Center in Calgary, AB, Canada.
Phone 403-220-8008

0==0==0==0==0

If you would like to see more bike modifications for arm amputees visit William Craigs' website: http://www.prostheticarm.com

0==0==0==0==0

For information on Mert Lawwill's riding hand and handle bar adaptor  visit: http://www.mertlawwill.com

0==0==0==0==0

For information on the Hopey steering dampener which slows down and stabilizes steering and control of the handlebar. Visit Hopey Steering Damper

0==0==0==0==0

For double (bilateral) arm amputees looking for a cruiser style bike with gears, Schwinn's Vera Cruz model offers a coasting 3 speed with internal automatic gear shifting and rear coaster brake.

0==0==0==0==0

Hi,
Just a couple of photos of my brake setups.
Cheers, Ed

Email Ed for more info. Edwingo@inbox.com

0==0==0==0==0

Asama bicycles offers a single lever dual stop linear pull brake lever for cable actuated brakes. www.asamabicycles.com

0==0==0==0==0

Sram has designed a new drive-train that uses a single front chain ring and a single rear shifter/deraileur. The system is called XX1, and includes either a grip shift or trigger shifter. For more info visit www.sram.com

0==0==0==0==0

Mountain Bike Modifications for Leg Amputees.

The following examples of Mountain Bike shoes and pedals for Leg Amputees are only a few of the many different possible shoe-pedal configurations.

You will see that it is possible to mix and match different shoes and pedals to suit your personal needs.

The best shoe-pedal configuration is the one that suits your disability along with your riding skills and style.

 

0==0==0==0==0

Kurt Yaeger, a former professional freestyle BMX rider who has competed in the X-Games, and a recent below knee amputee, has been using and highly recommends a new pedal system that uses magnets to hold your foot on the pedal.

Click on pictures to enlarge.

 

For more information visit: http://www.kurtyaeger.com  www.protonlocks.com or check out the video at: http://espn.go.com/action/bmx/blog/_/post/5513083/kurt-yaeger-excuses
 

0==0==0==0==0

Mountain Racing Products (MRP) manufactures Power Grip Pedals, which is a pedal system that uses a single strap that attaches diagonally across the pedal. The pedals are much easier to get in and out of in comparison to standard toe clips or most clip less pedals.

Click on picture to enlarge.

For more information visit: www.mountainracingproducts.com

0==0==0==0==0

Dan Mead along with fellow Prosthetist Bill Buston, have come up with a hinged crank arm that allows leg amputees and those suffering from limited range of movement in their knee to pedal.

0==0==0==0==0

The following photos were contributed by Jan Barlage, who is featured on the Leg Amputees page. He created this device to assist above knee amputees while going down stairs or steeps. The device, which was made by Tony Barela in Luxemburg, allows the rider to lock or hold the crank arm and pedal in a level position.

Adapter-oben.jpg (83584 bytes)   GF-vorn-1.jpg (128359 bytes)   Pedal-horizontal-2a.jpg (87323 bytes)IMG-0195.jpg (65071 bytes)   foot pedal break disk.jpg (69699 bytes)

If you would like more information you can email Jan or Tony at: jan@barlage.org / tony@tbsc.lu or visit www.barlage.org / www.tbsc.lu

0==0==0==0==0

The following pictures are of Steve Middleton. Steve, an avid outdoorsman and runner, was cycling home from work on Sept 11/2000. A truck travelling towards him in the wrong lane struck him head on.

You can see by these pictures that it is possible to mix different pedals and if you wanted, different shoes. Steve uses a clip less pedal & shoe system for his prosthetic leg and an old fashion toe clip for his good leg.

Click on pictures to enlarge.

Steve008.jpg (92659 bytes)   

 You can email Steve at: saam@shaw.ca or check out his website at: http://morethanmobility.ca/ for more information on Steve's leg and knee components.

0==0==0==0==0

The following pictures are of Alexander "Yankee" Malyshev who was born and lives in Moscow, Russia. Although Alexander lost his leg in 1999, he has been an avid mountain biker and cyclist since 1993. As you can see by the photos, the only modification Alexander uses is a toe clip for his prosthetic foot/leg.

Click on pictures to enlarge.

Alexander & Bike - 2.jpg (285770 bytes)  My Bike - 2.jpg (383535 bytes)

If you would like more information on Alexander you can email him at: kiborg-yankee3000@yandex.ru

0==0==0==0==0

The following picture and information was submitted by Susan Murray.

I am an above the knee amputee road bicyclist. I road for 15 years with my prosthesis on, hating every sitting minute. I wanted the freedom to stand up, to get the power from standing and thus designed this adaptation for my bike. Now I wear a prosthesis with a Ferrier coupler and before getting on the bike, take off the bottom half of the leg. This way I can "stand" on the platform I built and really power for miles and miles. I LOVE biking now! Susan.

Click on pictures to enlarge.

 

For more pictures and information check out the Leg Amputees page or email Susan at: smurray039@aol.com

0==0==0==0==0

I am Howie Cohen, consultant for Rotor System Cranks of Madrid, Spain. Rotor Cranks eliminate the dead spot in the pedaling rotation of a bike. The dead spot is that position wherein no power can be delivered to the rear wheel. The dead spot occurs twice in each 360 degree rotation of the cranks; when one crank is pointing straight down at 6 o’clock & the other crank is pointing up at 12 o’clock. The dead spot impedes the performance of all bicyclists but can be more debilitating to a cyclist with an amputated portion of the leg. It has been proven that the Rotor System Cranks enable bicyclists to enhance their athletic performance. In addition to enhancing performance through the mechanical innovation, Rotors eliminate knee soreness caused by pedaling with the dead spot. The Rotor requires that the cyclist use the larger muscles in the upper thigh & almost eliminates the use of the knee muscles & tendons for applying power to the rear wheel.  Pedaling while standing is very smooth & powerful in comparison to the traditional crank systems.

Mr. Joe Sapere, an amputee bicyclist from Chesapeake, VA wrote, “The cranks are turning and I couldn’t be happier and I am excited about being able to stand in the pedals on our ride next year”. Joe is a member of the Amputees Across America group.

We are a small company with a passion for bicycle & bicycling. We can offer financial assistance for our product when such assistance is needed. There is nothing like having first hand “on the road, trail and/or hill” experience. Rotors are always sold with a 100% satisfaction or money back guarantee and come in crank lengths 155, 165, 170, 172.5, 175 & 180. We can and do mix the crank length sizes to custom fit bicyclists with special needs. You can see more information on these two websites: www.rotorcranksusa.com (one of our online resellers) www.rotorbike.com (our factory website in Spain)

Sincerely, Howie Cohen, Rotor USA howie@rotorbike.com telephone (970) 453-2989 or cell (970) 389-7082

You can also visit the Suggestions From The Net page for more info.

0==0==0==0==0

The following suggestion was made by Ricardo Rueda.

Dear sirs, 

A few days ago I met this guy who invented this double traction bike and thought it might help some amputees. Take a look at the link: http://patmarinvent.com/index.php?mi=2 

Cheers, 

Ricardo Rueda. 

PS: I think the website is not very clear telling how does it work, but the upper part of the fork swings a little bit and that’s how traction gets to the front wheel.

0==0==0==0==0

The following suggestion was contributed by Alan Roberts who has 20+ years of technical/medical fabricating experience and has been riding bikes off-road long before they started calling them 'mountain bikes'. Alan recommends visiting the following website which contains information on a company that produces the 'mountain drive' bottom bracket gear reductions which could be very helpful for leg amputees. http://www.schlumpf.ch/md_engl.htm

0==0==0==0==0

Off Road Wheelchairs.

 

The following photos were contributed by Stacy Kohut from R-One, makers of off road wheelchairs. For more information visit;

http://www.r-onefourcross.com

Click on pictures to enlarge.

Stacy-outletcup04.jpg (183252 bytes)  

0==0==0==0==0

The following information was submitted by Ben King.

I've just completed a bike for my brother which I think could be useful for some people who may visit your site! It is a 3 wheeled recumbent which combines a normal sports chair as the seat and the wheelchair wheels as the bike wheels. The wheels are braked by fixed discs which stay with the bike when the chair is removed. I have also built the brakes so that when actuated sideways the back wheel is braked and when you pull, both front wheels are actuated. If you pull up hard, all 3 wheels will be braked.
Anyway...lots more features, just thought the idea may be useful for some others too?
Cheers
Ben

Click on pictures to enlarge.

For more information visit www.bikeben.com

0==0==0==0==0

Colours' N Motion

IBot

Innovation In Motion

Lasher Sport

Magic Wheels

One-Off Titanium

Med Equip

Parabasetec

Sportaid

Teftec Mobility

Top End

Natural Access Landeez

Deming Beach Wheelchair

Hippocampe

Frog Legs

Kenda Tires

Schwalbe Tires

Berkelbike recumbent & hand cycles

Mountain Trike

Freedom Bike

0==0==0==0==0

 

Stay tuned for future updates and additions.

0==0==0==0==0

 

News & Events

For upcoming events go to News And Events.

Google

Top of page

Designed & Maintained By: Aardvark Web Services